Photo Essay: Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance leads 30th Annual Halifax Pride Parade

The Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance at the 30th Annual Halifax Pride Parade/Photo by Stephen Brake

For the first time, an Indigenous-themed float led the 30th annual Halifax Pride Parade on July 22.The float was submitted by the Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance, an organization that represents Indigenous LGBTQ and Two-Spirits in Atlantic Canada.

The float was submitted by the Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance, an organization that represents Indigenous LGBTQ and Two-Spirits in Atlantic Canada.

According to Halifax Pride’s board member Ellen Davis, the decison to have the Indigenous float lead the parade is to support community organizations like the Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance.

The Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance at the 30th Annual Halifax Pride Parade/Photo by Stephen Brake

According to John R. Sylliboy, one of the co-founders of the Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance, the float itself was donated by the Glooscap First Nation.

The Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance at the 30th Annual Halifax Pride Parade/Photo by Stephen Brake

Tuma Young, also co-founder of the Wabanaki Two- Spirit Alliance, holds the eagle staff as he marches behind the float at the Halifax Pride Parade on Sat.

Millbrook First Nation Chief Bob Gloade, left, marches beside Young holding the Mi’kmaq Grand Council flag.

The Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance at the 30th Annual Halifax Pride Parade/Photo by Stephen Brake
The Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance at the 30th Annual Halifax Pride Parade/Photo by Stephen Brake
The Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance at the 30th Annual Halifax Pride Parade/Photo by Stephen Brake
The Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance at the 30th Annual Halifax Pride Parade/Photo by Stephen Brake
The Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance at the 30th Annual Halifax Pride Parade/Photo by Stephen Brake

Millbrook First Nation Chief Bob Gloade, left, Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance co-founder John R. Sylliboy, second from left, and Glooscap First Nation Chief Sidney Peters, second from right, marched in the Halifax Pride Parade on Sat.

Prime Justin Trudeau and his family marched in the Halifax Pride Parade on July 22/Photo by Stephen Brake

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also marched in the Halifax Pride Parade. It marked the first time a prime minister has marched in the parade since it first began in 1988.

The Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance at the 30th Annual Halifax Pride Parade/Photo by Stephen Brake
The Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance at the 30th Annual Halifax Pride Parade/Photo by Stephen Brake

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About Maureen Googoo 149 Articles
Maureen Googoo is an award-winning journalist from Indian Brook First Nation (Sipekne'katik) in Nova Scotia. She has worked in news for 30 years for media outlets such as CBC Radio, the Chronicle-Herald and the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network. Maureen has an arts degree in political science from Saint Mary's University in Halifax, a post-graduate degree in journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and a Masters degree in journalism from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York City.